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The emigrant’s tale — 3 Comments

  1. A lot of thoughtful republicans, those that didn’t travel to Spain, and some that did joined the British forces. Realising that a far worse devil was coming down the pike and if it wasn’t halted things would become real ugly.
    They saw the instincts of FG for what they were, seeing them closer to what the Boers developed in SA and the Southern States of the US and fellow travellers with Italy Spain and Portugal.

  2. There must have been a profound sense of disillusionment. I suppose joining the British army allowed an engagement in an anti-fascist struggle, not that it brought benefit to Ireland.

  3. FG was the old Irish Party who in 1918 saw the voter register go from 100,000 to 800,000+. But prior to WW1 they had locked in the church and with it business using the tools developed by O’Connell, more of less catholic’s went to catholic businesses. Of course the way things went from 1850 on allowed a duality to develop a bit like lately when some were profoundly protected while others were left exposed on a mountain.
    In the 20s FF could never have developed the State for those that had the financial wherewithal, but with the ’29 collapse Fg’s former moneymen were all but obliterated. This allowed FF to have an economic war with the UK which was in fact a rerun of the Civil War for the targets this time were the big farmers, FG’s source, and the source of the investment moneys.
    Or to put it another way. Huge moneys were made during the WW1. With none of it being invested in Ireland. If you want to see it today, travel along the southern coast of England from Dover to Cornwall and much of the Jerry build homes had investors from here.

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