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Disappointed of Ballybrack — 6 Comments

  1. “What does the letter ‘D’ stand for?”

    Answer: Dedicated to Duty? 😉

    Ian, my other half has also got ‘D’ status despite being resident in Ireland since 1967!

    I wonder if the problem is more ‘non-EU-citizen’ than non-Irish citizen but then that doesn’t explain why you folks can’t vote in a Presidential election?

  2. It would be the same here unless you had Aussie citizenship. I had to be naturalised in order to vote . . . doesn’t hurt a bit! Now I have the best of both worlds, still retain my British passport and I’m an Aussie citizen!

  3. Grannymar,

    I could go to prison as a ‘political prisoner’!

    Steph,

    How did he get the ‘D’ status? I got mine from telling an election official that I held a British passport. I should have used my driving licence, against place of birth it says: Eire. Now, Taunton is may things but it is definitely not part of Ireland.

    Baino,

    Irish citizens enjoy full voting rights in the United Kingdom under 1949 legislation; the Irish government has never fully reciprocated. I could have taken an Irish passport automatically up until a few years ago on the basis of marriage and residence, now I can’t be bothered. It gives the French immigration officials something to raise an eyebrow about when they are handed three Irish passports and one British one.

  4. “How did he get the ‘D’ status?”

    He holds a British passport having been born and schooled in the UK.

    We play that game with family passports too, with the British passport going on the top or the bottom of the pile according to the country we’re travelling through! 😀

  5. Snoopimg around the electoral register, I have found various people whom I know hold British passports, but are registered as Irish citizens.

    It obviously depends on the registration official!

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