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Not listening — 3 Comments

  1. I can relate to the ‘principle of control’ described here, however my experience is with children of 16 and above. The second paragraph does not relate to my experience of that age group. Respect is a key thing, we have the tool of ‘college’ to use with the learners (we suggest a ‘grown up enviroment requires a ‘grown up’ level of behaviour, language etc)It needs to be said that these children are what we call ‘dissafected’.

    My brief experience of dealing with 14-16 year olds was very different and there I felt was an element of mob rule. As part of my training I shadowed a secondary teacher for 2 weeks in a local school, during that time I felt as vunerable as the new year 7s (11 year olds)I was taken back to being a teenager and everyday for that fortnight I woke up full of anxiety and wanted someone to tell me that I didn’t have to go to school.

    To conclude on a positive note,a colleague, who has done her training more recently, had a very positive experience (in what is considered to be a sink school)

  2. It all sounds very scary to me.

    Mob rule means the toughest and hardest dominate – if that’s what is going on, should there not be a building of a national consensus against it? Shouldn’t everyone be saying that it’s not acceptable?

  3. That is what we are saying and demonstrating, to shout or to throw something would demonstrate a lack of control. I can honestly say that I have never felt threatened, un-nerved once or twice, but I have always pulled it back into my control.
    Inside the education system the children may have the odd ‘triumph’but they do not win overall. It is outside that the problems really occur in my experience.
    Most young people, for all their swagger and foul language have no power at all.

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