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Bonfire questions — 2 Comments

  1. I don’t think anyone ever quite analysed the issues in the North at their core.
    When there was jobs for the poorer sections it was reserved for the Unionists in very much the same way as the US south ans South Africa with the Boers.
    Then when things shifted on the jobs front they moved into the civil and public service. This simply removed the uneducated from both communities.
    People forget that once the industrial jobs went it became like the un-industrial areas of the South and the Welsh Valleys. Were the Troubles a symptom ?. I think they were. I also think Ireland as a whole is very Racist. Where places like Kilkenny and Clonmel up until very very recently were English towns, as in Old English and didn’t change until the 80s and even then only slightly.
    So, you had Old Irish like myself, Old English like families of the Normans, the Newer English and the families from the Scots and English Border(DUP and officials). Just check the phone book in Langholm and Hawick, and the names north of the Wall to the west and you see the same names like Ellis, Armstrong and Trimble.
    On the bonfires. I’d be saying by now they are tradition and I don’t see why the councils don’t designate a spot well out of town. And then blanket remove anything else.
    But back to the point. Outside of farming income and that drawn from the State as wages and social support what else it there ?.

  2. Within the republican community, the influence of liberation theology, particularly among the religious orders, allowed the church to engage with issues of poverty and community development. The Protestant churches never had any comparable theology.

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