Comments

Off the square — 8 Comments

  1. My father was a Mason for many years (he didn’t care much for the organisation in Australia and left) but I’m sure he did it because they committed to community projects without the religious connotation. He was a deeply ‘spiritual’ man but had no particular religious conviction and so it suited him. I often wondered about the ‘secret handshake’ he never did tell!

  2. You raise a big question there, Ian.

    Did the RC church create a moral vacuum when it discredited itself, or did it simply mask a moral vacuum while it still held power?

  3. Baino,

    I understand there is a ‘Freemasons’ edition in the ‘For Dummies’ series now!

  4. Bock,

    I’m not sure anyone from a minority community could answer that question. What were ordinary Catholics thinking in those years when McQuaid ran the country?

  5. Ian, I met a few folk up here who were in everything but the Crib!
    Jack on the other hand would reply when asked to join some organisation that he wouldn’t even join a lunch club!

  6. I don’t know if ordinary Catholics were thinking at all when McQuaid ran the country.

    I also don’t think anyone is disqualified from holding an opinion on this, because we’re all from a minority community in one way or another.

  7. Bock,

    As I read Cooney’s book last year, I wondered about the intelligentsia, surely they cannot all have lost all critical faculties?

    McQuaid’s reign (and the rigid enforcement of Ne Temere) seems very much to have turned the Church of Ireland defensively in upon itself to the extent that it’s possible even now to live in an almost parallel society. We only speak when things impinge upon us – such as O’Keeffe’s attack on a grant to our secondary schools last year. The Catholic Church still presumes to speak for the whole society and there is a very deep institutional sectarianism.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *