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Forgotten memories — 5 Comments

  1. Your memory is not as impaired as you might think. I too have memories of the 70s and 80s. The story about the army taking over was put forward many times. But I don’t imagine for one moment that it was a “story by an English journalist”.
    Qui bono? It is to the benefit of the political establishment to have such a story abroad. Bad times. Stardust, hunger strikes, financial chaos. Where better to plant the seed thn in the head of a young man reading the paper on the beach. Shoeless to show his carefree nature. While all around is a whrlwind of rumour.
    Bring in the army. Pour encourager les autres. Stiffen our resolve. Trust the system.
    It’s not your bad memory – it’s a good memory! Huxley or Orwell would have loved the notion of seeding memories.
    Don’t worry, my own memory is woefully inadequate.

  2. Googling ‘Irish army’ and ‘coup’, the only reference I could find was to rumours in 1969-70

    Shoeless? Because he had been thrown into the sea. Carefree? Would reading the Observer mark one out as carefree?

  3. On the subject of stories that never make the news. I’m reading the depressing book Flat Earth News bz Nick Davies. Leaving aside all malice, bribery and corruption – the almost all-pervasive problem is that journalism has become “churnalism” – with the staff churning it out so fast, for different editions and news platforms, with fewer colleagues and little time to check anything.
    As for the coup, I’ve never heard of it as far as I can remember. But there used to be lots of speculative and fanciful stories filling new columns on the basis of dodgy tip-offs.

  4. Churnalism seems necessary to fill the rolling news channels. BBC and Sky News reporters seem trained in putting on a voice that makes every minor event sound as if it is of world importance.

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