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Communal remains — 5 Comments

  1. I don’t agree with Levade’s first paragraph (though I take his point). I think the remembering goes on longer and further back than that – even if we don’t speak about it aloud all the time.

  2. Blackwatertown is right, I think. Perhaps the current popularity of genealogy has something to do with re-membering those from whom we spring, even if we never met them. I’m lucky enough to have burial rights in a family graveyard, where my parents are buried with 4 previous generations of my mother’s family and a host of cousins. God willing I will be planted in that beautiful place myself in God’s good time, where I now find I personally knew more than half the inhabitants. But through family genealogy and records now made accessible on the internet I know a little about many others, and have encountered many of their descendents now living in other countries with whom to re-member – it is good for the peace of the world to have such global connections, I think.

    But in the end all will be dust, and remembered only unto God.

  3. Levade is a believer, and bully for him. Of course he is correct in stating he will be forgotten – it’s just a matter of time. But why, Ian, do you pose the question at the end? And why do you pose it in such a way? It feels a little like a question asked by a teacher of a group of fifth years, a question to prompt debate. If they are not known unto God, is there a God?
    Sorry to appear flippant. All loss of life, especially through violence, is abhorrent. God has very little to do with it.

  4. KV,

    The question is pertinent to theists. The dominant religious traditions have asserted that subscribing to their beliefs is a requirement of being known to their God. I do not think God can be so confined.

    I’m afraid I know nothing of fifth formers, so have no idea of what questions they might be asked.

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