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Sermon for the Day of Pentecost, 2014 — 2 Comments

  1. I was intrigued with the three strands of Scripture, Tradition and Reason.

    It brought back a book that did leave an impression here – Making Love by Tom Inglis

    “And what of my own beliefs and practices during this time as I watched the love of my life slowly but surely dying in front of me? I was all over the place. Like Aileen, I grew up with God. He was a close friend for many years. I would love if he existed. Miracles can and do happen, but I have always thought that they were probably extraordinary cases of chance or mind over matter. Nevertheless, in those dark days as I walked around the local park in the early morning, I would scream out to God not to let her die. I hoped, but deep down I knew that there was as much chance of her not dying as her cut-off breast being restored.

    God is hope. I live in hope that there is another meaning and explanation to all of this, to our joy and happiness, to our suffering and pain. I have no idea if there is life after death, or even what life after death means. I hope that we dissolve into a love supreme which is way beyond our imagination, which is way beyond human knowledge and understanding. But if God is infinite perhaps we should abandon thinking longitudinally and think laterally. He is by our side but we cannot comprehend him. Sometimes I think that trusting God requires letting go all that we think is solid, material and real, even reason itself. It is a tall order to give up the air of certainty, mastery and control which we breathe so easily.” (p 198)

  2. The church is probably the biggest obstacle to Tom Inglis’ suggestion that we think “laterally”; institutions depend on longitudinal thinking, too much of the other and authority and status, and all the things church leaders so much value, begin to crumble away.

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