Comments

The summer lands — 3 Comments

  1. You know my opinion that the true economic basic for farming on these islands ended about 1919. And with the exception of the second world war the progression to something akin to a thought experiment has continued til today. Yes, there’s money to be made in farming on these islands, but it’s not to be made by farmers. But at least in England the continuing existence of some of the great estates has lessened the full force of world economics.
    I have a friend in Iowa who’s family treated farming as a desk exercise and so could go to banks and present case after case for the banks to loan them money. So where they started with 600 acres in 1983, grew through the collapse of farming in the US, to now having 20,000 acres. Now here’s the rub. They are operating at about 45% of what they could. For us,this means, a State in the USA could by ramping up production cover all our output, vastly cheaper.

  2. Interestingly, the economic growth in our community seems to owe little to agriculture and much more to entrepreneurship in the establishment of small businesses. The shops now in the town would have been unimaginable to the small farming community of forty years ago.

  3. But that’s the core to my point. These islands had and still have an economic system designed to core out and export the result. While in Europe you will have local government and regional government replacing the old ducal system and investing in small industry. So the money spins within the local area. That doesn’t happen here. ( and by here I mean both islands) We prefer to invest high risk and offshore.

    I think the farm subsidy as currently designed can only empty the countryside.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.