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Homes and leisure — 2 Comments

  1. The fault lies with a combination of factors and Hammond treating one isn’t going to make an iota of difference. Basically what I’m trying to say is people react logically to their own ends and if both these islands have the same problem it’s the self same causes in both.
    One, we have international buyers of town centre property. Canada Life is one, but there are many others. They don’t care if they are drawing a rent or not for they can offset elsewhere. Two, rates; these are set at levels that actively prevent new enterprises. Three; the combo of rent and rates take out shops that draw people in, cafés and coffee shops are for the most part non-existent and where they do the chances of getting a great coffee, nil. Four, insurance
    How then will he split off the over shop accommodation without removing a source of income for the CoCo’s, the insurance, and the landlords. And how exactly will he get around 130 years of doing things that isn’t going to transfer costs back to the point no income will be drawn. Indeed I expect rents won’t come close to covering the costs of making the over-shop areas habitable.

  2. I think the thinking is that entire buildings, not just the upper floors, will become residential – councils will be vehemently opposed!

    I remember one Irish county councillor calling for there to be parking charges at out of town centres – although he didn’t explain how he was going to force supermarkets to charge for the use of the space they owned and which they used as an attraction for shoppers.

    France seems to have been better able to combine the large hypermarkets with lively high streets of independent shops, although perhaps French shoppers are more discerning in their purchases.

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