Comments

Dying thoughts — 6 Comments

  1. Look, he’s dead. All the religious stuff is for the survivors. You leave your mark on the living by your friendship and your caring and your love. It happens naturally as you live your life.

    It has nothing to do with your demise, except to the extent that your friends are heartbroken at your loss. That’s the measure of your life. The sadder they are, the better you be.

    You want to know how an old Scottish Prod should arrive, become beloved and die in an ancient Irish Catholic city? Read this.

  2. I like the thought of echoes that we leave…we buried the last of our uncles a couple of weeks ago – terrible funeral – no structure/dignity – little about his not insignificant life – no comfort – no friendliness in the service – just cold, hard, hell-fire stuff from the tradition I left some years ago. His widow was just glad that the minister hadn’t turned up in jeans as he had done for two baptisms on the previous Sunday! A member of the congregation needs time to reflect, to feel the loss and to be comforted… May all the funerals that we conduct give mourners the opportunity to think about the echoes…

  3. As far as I am aware, my friend is not particularly religious – an agnostic maybe, I don’t know. I only talk politics with him; he’s rather good at economics The ‘echoes’ for him were the marks his father had left.

    I love the Scottish Prod funeral piece. I used to end up doing a lot of funerals for people where there was clearly no religious belief. Jock’s way of doing things is much more honest.

  4. I don’t understand the ‘evangelical’ dislike for doing stuff without any dignity. You would have thought that had he wished for a sympathetic hearing he might have tried to establish some rapport with his listeners.

  5. Sometimes we hear the echoes at times and in places where we least expect them.

    A simple touch can be so much more effective than words.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *